No on Proposition 13-  Public School Bond Tax

The Amendment being offered to the voters is a tax to be added to our current property taxes and I fully oppose this measure.

It’s interesting how the democrats are selling this tax bond- as safety and for education. They know from past elections that when the words “safety” or “education” are used, voters usually vote yes on the measure.

This is a bad measure and we should all stand against the passage of this measure.

Listed below is what is in the bill they want you to approve:

The Public Preschool, K-12, and College Health and Safety Bond Act of 2020

The Public Preschool, K-12, and College Health and Safety Bond Act of 2020 authorizes $15 billion for the construction and modernization of public preschool, K-12, California Community Colleges (CCC), University of California (UC), and California State University (CSU) facilities.

This measure will is the ballot for the March 3, 2020.

Background: AB 48 (O’Donnell) establishes the Public Preschool, K-12, and College Health and Safety Bond Act of 2020 authorizing $15 billion in bond funds to be allocated as follows: $9 billion for Preschool to Grade 12 school facilities as follows: $2.8 billion for new construction; $5.2 billion for modernization; $500 million for charter schools; and, $500 million for career technical education.

With respect to financial hardship eligibility, the initiative would increase the total bonding capacity cap from $5 million to $15 million; $2 billion for the UC and the Hastings College of Law; $2 billion for the CSU; and, $2 billion for community college facilities.

The last statewide general obligation bond, Proposition 51, was approved by voters in November 2016. Proposition 51 authorized a total of $9 billion in state general obligation bond funds with $7 billion for K-12 education facilities and $2 billion for community college facilities.

The measure will likely be supported by the Education Coalition, California Community College Chancellor’s Office, the University of California Trustees, California State University, Office of the Chancellor and the Building Trades, among others.

Likely opposition would come from groups like the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association and the California Taxpayers Network.